Moving to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico with Kids – Update

Moving to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico with Kids – Update


July 31, 2019
When we moved to Puerto Vallarta our kids were 4 and 5 years old so we felt the timing made sense for the transition to a new country and a new culture. And, as it turns out, we were right.

Puerto Vallarta, Mexico – About 8 years ago we moved our family to Mexico. I wrote an article then about the trials and tribulations of the move and thought it would be timely to give an update.

¿Habla Español?

When we moved to Puerto Vallarta our kids were 4 and 5 years old so we felt the timing made sense for the transition to a new country and a new culture. And, as it turns out, we were right. The kids picked up Spanish with ease and quickly became fluent. Their Spanish is perfect and they can switch between English and Spanish – depending on who they are speaking to – on a dime. As for their parents? Well let’s just say that it hasn’t been as fast for us to master the language. The proof is when our kids give us blank stares when we speak to them in what we think is perfect Spanish!

Finding a School That Meets Your Needs

In my last article I wrote about the terrific private school options for children in Puerto Vallarta. Because all schools are not the same, if I had to start the process all over again I would likely be more thorough in my analysis. There is a standard Spanish curriculum that all schools are required to follow, but that’s pretty much where the similarities end.

Some schools offer extensive sports programs, while others don’t. Some are heavier on theatre and music. Some offer swimming lessons on site. Some are more rigid and others more relaxed. In terms of academia, some schools follow a project-based learning approach, while others follow more traditional teaching methods.So, when it comes to choosing a school, my advice is to make a checklist of the elements that are most important for your child to thrive. Make a short list of the three schools that fit the bill. And most importantly, if timing permits, visit those schools to experience what they have to offer firsthand.

Being Social

If the school you choose is not in the neighbourhood in which you live, it can be a challenge for kids to hang out with their friends after school. When we grew up, our school was in the neighbourhood in which we lived and our school friends were our neighbours. So it was very easy for us to get together after school once home.

Our place in Puerto Vallarta was a 20 minute drive from school, and there were no similar-aged kids in our condo. So we needed to make a concerted effort to get to know the parents of our kids’ school friends and plan out play dates in advance so that our kids could stay connected with their friends.

Staying Active

The typical school day starts early, sometimes as early as 7:15, and ends at around 2:30. While our kids would love nothing more than to spend the rest of their waking hours on their “devices” we made sure that there were non-electronic-based activities for them to participate in after school.

Many schools offer after school programs, including soccer, basketball, gymnastics, swimming, archery, chorus, and the list goes on. If your school doesn’t have the specific programs that your kids are into, there are many private facilities that do. Puerto Vallarta has some great tennis and golf clubs. It seems there is a gym on every corner, offering unlimited exercise options.Advanced gymnastics programs are typically not offered at schools, due to the need for proper equipment, but group programs can be found at private gyms for around 125 pesos a week ($7 USD).

Learn About the Culture

On one of our first days in Puerto Vallarta we decided to walk through the neighbourhood to one of our favourite restaurants. On the way we met neighbours who were having a birthday party for their child. The parents gave our children two beautifully decorated eggs. We said gracias and continued our walk to the restaurant – my mother and I protecting the two eggs so as not to break them. When we arrived at the restaurant, so proud that the eggs made it, our waiter told us what the eggs were for. These eggs are meant to be smashed over someone’s head so that the confetti inside comes out.

Yep.

There was a lot for us to learn.

Go With the Flow

When coming to a new country there can often be a tendency to expect things to be as we were accustomed to in the country we moved from. And when things are not, the result is frustration. Kids can sense and feel their parent’s frustration and from the beginning we did not want that for our kids.

Of course it’s easier said than done, but when in a situation where the process doesn’t quite make sense, or when something is taking a bit – okay a lot – longer than it did back home, my advice is to take a deep breath and be thankful.

Thankful for the beautiful warm weather; thankful for the gorgeous landscape from the ocean to the Sierra Madres; thankful for the warmth of the people of Mexico; thankful for being welcomed to a county and city like no other.


Warren Brander is an expert real estate agent working with Remax in Puerto Vallarta. He can be reached at 322-200-2253, or by email at warren(at)remaxinpv.com. You can also check out his website for a great selection of Puerto Vallarta condos and homes for sale at WarrenBrander.com.To learn more about Warren Brander Real Estate, click HERE.

Single Story For Sale in 5 de Diciembre, Puerto Vallarta

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Beautiful spacious 3 bdrm condo!

•  219.4 sqm , 3 bath , 3 bdrm single story FOR SALE  USD299,000 .
MLS® 16107

Las Vistas 20 is located on the top of a hill in 5 de Diciembre. If you are you are looking for a beautiful and spacious condo look no further. then Condo Las Vistas 20 is a must see. It is close to the beach, great restaurants and Puerto Vallarta’s famous Zona Romantica. You will love entertaining friends and family in this 3 bed, 3 bath, a huge living room, cooking your favorite meal in the spacious kitchen.

Las Vistas 20 se encuentra en la cima de una colina en 5 de Diciembre. Si estás buscando un condominio hermoso y espacioso, no busques más. entonces Condo Las Vistas 20 es una visita obligada. Está cerca de la playa, de excelentes restaurantes y de la famosa Zona Romántica de Puerto Vallarta. Te encantará entretener a amigos y familiares en esta sala de 3 dormitorios, 3 baños, una gran sala de estar, cocinar tu comida favorita en la espaciosa cocina.

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Frolicking in the mud at Los Negritos, a natural wonder in Michoacán

Mexico Life
Locals say there are about 15 pools of boiling mud at Los Negritos.Locals say there are about 15 pools of boiling mud at Los Negritos.

Frolicking in the mud at Los Negritos, a natural wonder in Michoacán

Restorative mud pots and ‘fools’ fire’ at Los Negritos Lake near Lake Chapala

Anywhere else, Los Negritos Lake would have been turned into a recreational area and its curative and beautifying mud pots into an expensive spa.

But in El Platanal, Michoacán, the local people seem content to keep their natural wonders as they are rather than “developing” them.

If you happen to live anywhere near Lake Chapala, you should note that Los Negritos is practically in your back yard. If you love nature, you’ll be fascinated by the strange shapes and noises of its boiling mud pots and, if you suffer from arthritis, you may find an inexpensive — albeit dirty — possible solution to your problem.

I first heard about Los Negritos from José Luis Zavala, a biologist studying the fish in the area. He explained that this lagoon is unique because it contains all the aquatic creatures that used to be found in Lake Chapala.

“Laguna Los Negritos is actually hydraulically connected to Chapala,” said Zavala, “but it hasn’t been polluted. It’s a perfect laboratory for studying what Lake Chapala must have been like years ago.”

Four friends having fun in the mud.

Four friends having fun in the mud.

The lake is rumored to be 700 meters deep, but Zavala calls this a myth.

Tall shade trees and several roofed kiosks make the laguna shore an ideal picnic spot and the mud pots are located only 400 meters northwest of the lake, easy to reach on foot over perfectly flat ground.

The mud is black as black can be and the boiling pots are mostly less than a meter in diameter. So “Los Negritos” (The Little Black Ones) is a fitting name for the place. We came upon at least a dozen boiling, hissing, plopping mud pots interspersed with small bogs and occasional wallowing holes filled with cool mud that would bring joy to the heart of any hedonistic porker.

So much moisture, of course, has brought lots of birds to this area and you can see vermillion flycatchers, golden-fronted woodpeckers, house finches, egrets and if you’re lucky you may even spot a white owl.

“Lots of people have drowned in the lake,” a local rancher told us, apparently because it drops straight down from the shoreline with no shallow spots for waders. He said a few people have drowned in some of the cool mud pools whose rims look far more solid than they really are.

However, he assured us that there are great benefits from getting up to your neck in mud, particularly if you suffer from arthritis. One must, however, be careful not to confuse the cool mud with the hot sort.

Los Negritos Lake is connected to Lake Chapala, but is said to be clean.

Los Negritos Lake is connected to Lake Chapala, but is said to be clean.

“One of my horses sank into what seemed to be cool mud and the heat was so intense, the poor horse lost two of its hooves,” explained the ranchero.

Our informant also told us that geysers sometimes shoot several meters into the air, but when and where this might occur is impossible to predict. Finally, our rancher friend said it may be worth staying overnight among the mud pots because occasionally they produce “big green flames.”

We imagined this must refer to the legendary will o’ the wisp or ignis fatuus (fool’s fire), a ghostly light said to hover over bogs, supposedly leading one either to rich treasures or perdition. Science tells us the phenomenon is the result of gases released by decaying organic matter, an explanation that’s not nearly as much fun.

When my friend Mario Guerrero told me he was going camping at Lake Negritos, I asked him to check out those green flames. A few days later, he sent me the following message. I think it nicely captures the flavor of many weekend excursions in Mexico. Tongue in cheek, he described his trip as “nothing special or unusual.”

“You asked me how our trip to Los Negritos went and I can report that it was todo sin novedad (nothing special).

“We started out fine in the morning in two vehicles, but when we stopped to pick up our compañeros, one of the cars refused to start. However, by pushing it, we finally got it going.

The thick black mud is said to cure all sorts of ailments, especially arthritis.

The thick black mud is said to cure all sorts of ailments, especially arthritis.

“A few hours later, about half a kilometer from Villamar — the closest town to Los Negritos — my own car suddenly died. It was the gas pump — totally shot. So, we had to tow it to Villamar using my friend’s car which, unfortunately, again refused to start.

“However, we push-started it . . . and got to Villamar where we found only one mechanic and he was hopelessly drunk. However, he staggered over to my car, looked at the pump, said he could fix it, but declared that there was no way to get a new one the same day because the spare parts store was closed.

“So, we left my car . . . and told him he should fix it as soon as he sobered up. ‘Just leave me money for the pump,’ he replied, ‘and a bottle of tequila.’

“Then all six of us piled into the other car. It was pretty crowded . . . .

“Finally, we arrived at Los Negritos at 10:00pm It was so dark we couldn’t see a thing, not even the lake. All we wanted to do by then was hit the sack. We went to the first kiosk, but what did we find in the middle of it but a big coral snake about two meters long.

“. . . we chased it away, but nobody in the group wanted to sleep in that particular kiosk anymore, so we went off in the dark looking for another one. Like I said, nothing ‘unusual’ about this trip.

    • 10—-La-Negrita
      Testing out the beautifying powers of the black mud of Los Negritos.
  • 2—-Collecting-mud
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  • 9—-How-to-photograph-a-mud-pot
  • 10—-La-Negrita
  • 11—-mud-pot

“. . . we set up our tents inside the next kiosk and now it was about midnight. Then I remembered I promised to check out those mud pots for you. Well, I had the GPS coordinates, so we had no choice but to traipse off into the darkness looking for them.

“Since we couldn’t see where we were going, we ended up walking through mud so thick and sticky it soon looked like we had cannonballs at the ends of our legs. Finally, we found the mud pots, turned off our lights and discovered absolutely nothing: no green flames, no mysteries, no ghosts. In fact, once again nothing unusual.

“. . . two hours later we finally crawled into our tents — when all hell broke loose.

“A hurricane-like wind hit us and suddenly the surface of the lake was churning with monster waves. We had to jump on top of our tents to hold them down. I swear that wind was blowing over 200 kilometers per hour, but it finally weakened a bit and at last we were getting ready to go to bed when — it started to rain.

“Well, the wind was still blowing pretty hard and, therefore, we had rain coming at us horizontally. The roof of the kiosk wasn’t doing us any good at all and in a few minutes all of us and our gear were soaking wet . . . We didn’t get to sleep until 3:00am. It was just another one of those nights — nothing special at all.

“The next day we found the mechanic as drunk as ever, but the new gas pump was installed perfectly.

Mud pots at Lago Los Negritos

“On our way home we stopped at a taco stand under a canopy and what happened? While we were eating, another sudden downpour hits us — more horizontal rain — and we walked out of the ‘restaurant’ soaked again.

“Finally, at 11:00pm we arrived home after a rather long weekend but, gracias a Dios, a weekend sin novedad, with nothing special to report.”

To visit Los Negritos — if my friend’s report doesn’t dissuade you — ask Google Maps for directions to “Lago Los Negritos, Michoacán.” The mud pots are located at N20.06285 W102.61573 and yes, you can input these coordinates into Google Maps.

If you prefer old-fashioned directions, see Volume One of Outdoors in Western Mexico. Driving time from the town of Ajijic on Lake Chapala is just over two hours.

The writer has lived near Guadalajara, Jalisco, for more than 30 years and is the author of A Guide to West Mexico’s Guachimontones and Surrounding Area and co-author of Outdoors in Western Mexico. More of his writing can be found on his website.

CAFÉ DES ARTISTES INVITES TO THE CARPACCIO AND CRAFT BEER FEST

CAFÉ DES ARTISTES INVITES TO THE CARPACCIO AND CRAFT BEER FEST

Estefanía Montes

Jul. 19, 2019
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Café des Artistes (Guadalupe Sánchez 740, El Centro) has prepared one of the summer’s freshest specials: The Carpaccio and Craft Beer Fest, that will be celebrated from July 15th to August 15th of 2019.

From 6:00pm, Café des Artistes will offer a special menu focused on the carpaccio, a fresh and peculiar dish that combines representative ingredients from Puerto Vallarta and Europe, with the distinctive touch of the chef Thierry Blouet.

To pair this light dish and cool off, you would be able to taste the diverse craft beer options that will be available in the menu, where you will find national and international brands.

Make a reservation by clicking here.

8TH EDITION OF THE CEVICHE AND AGUACHILE FEST IN PUERTO VALLARTA

8TH EDITION OF THE CEVICHE AND AGUACHILE FEST IN PUERTO VALLARTA

Estefanía Montes

Jul. 23, 2019
258 views

This Sunday July 28th of 2019, you will be able to enjoy the 8th edition of the Ceviche and Aguachile Fest, which will take place at the Lázaro Cárdenas square.

During this eighth edition, you will be able to try more than 30 different types of ceviche and aguachile, where recognized local restaurants will present their unique and new recipesin a culinary celebration ideal for this summer.

To complete the experience a variety of drinks such as flavored water, cocktails and craft beer will be available. And for dessert, a delicious homemade sherbet.

This event will start at 1:00pm, it will be open for the public and will offer special prices.

To learn more about the 8th Ceviche and Aguachile Fest in Puerto Vallarta, click here.

Charming Guachinango: shimmering beauty, mining legends in Sierra Occidental

Mexico Life
Guachinango’s plaza speaks of peace and prosperity.Guachinango’s plaza speaks of peace and prosperity.

Charming Guachinango: shimmering beauty, mining legends in Sierra Occidental

Forget the Taj Mahal, see this Jalisco town’s sparkling church instead

The little town of Guachinango lies hidden in the hills of the Sierra Occidental, 100 kilometers west of Guadalajara.

Mention Guachinango to most Mexicans and they will say, “Oh, yes, that delicious fish, huachinango.” Actually, the word Guachinango means “place surrounded by trees,” although today “place surrounded by mines,” might suit it better.

The rumors that occasionally reached me about this little town, however, did not refer to its mines, but to its quiet beauty. “Guachinango has the prettiest plaza in all Mexico,” I heard. And even: “Forget the Taj Mahal, you should see Guachinango’s sparkling church.”

So, one not-so-fine day during the rainy season, my wife and I drove off to see the little town, which is less than a two-hour drive from Guadalajara. We were truly impressed by the incredible beauty of that church, which is covered with hundreds of thousands of pieces of broken porcelain plates and saucers, and we were utterly charmed by the quiet beauty of the plaza.

Unfortunately, we couldn’t take pictures that day because the sky was filled with roiling black clouds and we couldn’t visit the local museum because it was a Sunday.

Detail of the porcelain-covered church.

Detail of the porcelain-covered church.

So, we decided to come back on a weekday in December in the morning when the sun lights up the dazzling façade of the church and takes your breath away. After enjoying the overall view, we examined the church wall up close. The shards of plates, cups and knickknacks have their own stories to tell — in Spanish, English and even Chinese!

When you step inside the church, you come upon the first clue as to how such a small community could afford such a magnificent church. The altar is covered with gold and it’s the real thing, the product of the many mines in the hills just outside town.

For a fine view of those hills, you can ascend an extremely narrow, one-person-at-a-time circular staircase — built in the 1800s — which takes you up to the bell tower where you can wander about the roof, if you dare.

As for the plaza, the flower gardens, benches and kiosks are laid out in a picture-perfect way. I’m surprised film crews are not at work in this town every day; you couldn’t ask for a better movie set.

Next we visited La Casa de Cultura, which has a large, modern museum on the upper floor. Here we discovered that the original town of Guachinango — located a few kilometers from the present site — was a well-organized indigenous community long before the Spaniards arrived. They grew corn, calabash, beans and chiles, spoke Náhuatl, had their own distinctive style of ceramics and buried their dead in deep shaft tombs.

The Spaniards arrived in 1525, but the “modern” history of Guachinango actually began in 1545 when Juan Fernández de Hijar “found a very good silver mine” in what is now the center of town and a new community gradually formed around it.

Altar plated with gold from the town’s nearby mines.

Altar plated with gold from the town’s nearby mines.

This must have been a very large mine because no sooner was it in operation than “300 indigenas and nine negroes rebelled and ran off into the hills to hide,” apparently none too happy about being enslaved. The Spaniards, of course, squelched the miners’ futile grasp at freedom and dignity.

By 1550 the Province of Guachinango had a grand total of 215 mines, including El Barqueño, which local officials say “is thought to have had the most important gold reserves in all Mexico.”

Naturally, we were now curious about Guachinango’s mines and, when we asked about them in the town hall, a young man named Nacho immediately offered to show us a few. He then recruited a friend, who in turn commandeered a truck and off we went. The first place we visited were the ruins of a big mill only five minutes from town where ore was ground into powder. These ruins are just off the highway and very easy to reach. Just follow the instructions below.

From the mill, we walked along an old track shaded by thick pines and oaks until we came to a deep, dark tunnel which disappeared into the hillside. We poked around the entrance, hoping to find a piece of gold-bearing ore, but refrained from entering the shaft as old mines are infamous for falling beams and unseen deep pits.

After that I thought we’d be heading back to town, but our enthusiastic guides said, “Oh, there’s another mine just up ahead.” That one, of course, was not far from yet another and we soon traversed half of Cerro La Catarina until at last we came to El Aguacero Mine, the site of a famous incident.

Here, in 1952, Don Salomé Hernández was working deep inside the mine, 50 meters from the entrance, when the tunnel collapsed, trapping him. During the following days, rescuers could hear him banging rocks together to indicate he was alive. After seven days, he was rescued, but emerged in very weak condition.

View of the town from Cerro la Catarina.

View of the town from Cerro la Catarina.

Legend has it that he had managed to survive all that time by eating the new leather straps he had recently attached to his huaraches. As for water, they say he had none during his entire ordeal.

On his way to the hospital in Guadalajara, according to our guides, he opened his eyes and said, “I had horrible visions there in the darkness, but I’ve been reborn . . . thank God!”

After visiting the mines, our guides drove us to the very top of Cerro La Catarina from which we could enjoy a magnificent view of Guachinango and the Sierra Occidental.

Upon our return to town, we followed our guides’ advice and went shopping first for the very tasty local bread and then for bolitas, a chewy candy made from guavas, but infinitely tastier than any other we’ve come upon — the makers say their formula is a family secret. Bolitas are available from just about any grocery store in town.

Guachinango is a bit remote, but the roads leading to it are in great shape and you’ll have no problem getting there in any sort of vehicle. Try to go in the morning to get the best view of the sparkling church facade.

To reach the center of Guachinango, ask Google Maps to take you to “Kiosco De La Plaza Civica, Guachinango.”

If you would like to visit the old mill, drive back out of Guachinango the way you came in and turn right (south) onto a dirt road two kilometers from the plaza. Follow this 330 meters and park in front of the home of Sebastián and Jesús, two old gambusinos (prospectors).

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Guachinango

Ask them if you can visit the ruins of the Molino (mill), which lie 250 meters south of their house.

Guachinango is picturesque and historic Mexico at its best.

The writer has lived near Guadalajara, Jalisco, for more than 30 years and is the author of A Guide to West Mexico’s Guachimontones and Surrounding Area and co-author of Outdoors in Western Mexico. More of his writing can be found on his website.

RIVIERA NAYARIT RENEWS ITS BLUE FLAG CERTIFICATIONS

Blue Flag designation (about cleanliness and services) is very difficult to get and we are proud of the beaches that have attained and maintained that!

The Puerto Vallarta continues to invest in our environment and to maximize the enjoyment of our natural resources, for both owners and visitors.

RIVIERA NAYARIT RENEWS ITS BLUE FLAG CERTIFICATIONS

On Monday, July 15, 2019, Blue Flag certificates were awarded to the beach at Nuevo Vallarta Norte and the Marina Riviera Nayarit during a ceremony headed by Miguel Torruco Marqués, Mexico’s Secretary of Tourism, and Antonio Echeverría García, Governor of the State of Nayarit. Both venues are in the municipality of Bahía de Banderas in the Riviera Nayarit. The Lagoon at Santa María del Oro (municipality of Santa María del Oro), and the Marina Fonatur San Blas (municipality of San Blas) are also within the Riviera Nayarit.

The event took place at the Marina Fonatur in the Historic Port of San Blas, where they raised the corresponding flag. This occasion marked the first time the marina received this international certification.

Thanks to these credentials, the state of Nayarit has become an example for the nation. According to Torruco Marqués, this “speaks to the commitment the tourism service providers and the community have with the environment.”

He stated that over the next three decades, people would have more free time and more income. Therefore, “those nations that best preserve their environment and, above all, conserve their historical, cultural, and culinary identity, will be the ones who will participate fully in the extraordinary economic revenue generated by tourism.”

Ana Cecilia Llanos Guzmán, Secretary of Tourism of the State of Nayarit, also made a distinguished appearance at the event, along with the municipal presidents of Bahía de Banderas, Jaime Cuevas Tello, and Candy Yescas, from San Blas.

The Foundation for Environmental Education (FEE) sets the protocols for Blue Flag certifications. Joaquín Díaz Ríos, executive director for the entity’s Mexico chapter, offered the explanatory statements: The main criteria taken into account for this award are water quality, environmental education and management, safety, and services.

Of note is the fact the certification is valid for one year. Because of this, at the end of every summer the beaches are up for recertification after an exhaustive evaluation.

MORE INFO:

+ According to statistics offered by the Ministry of Tourism, Mexico is first in line in Latin America as to the number of Blue Flags received and in 13th place worldwide.

+ Currently, 54 beaches and three marinas in 13 municipalities and six states in Mexico have the certification: Baja California Sur, Nayarit, Jalisco, Guerrero, Oaxaca, and Quintana Roo.

+ The Riviera Nayarit received its first Blue Flag for the beach at Nuevo Vallarta Norte in 2013, which has maintained its certification since then.

+ The Marina Riviera Nayarit in La Cruz de Huanacaxtle received its Blue Flag in 2015, the first of its kind to receive this international award.

+ The lagoon at Santa María del Oro raised its first Blue Flag in August of 2016.

 

PERCEPTION OF SECURITY IN PUERTO VALLARTA HAS INCREASED

The perception of insecurity increased in the municipalities of Guadalajara and Zapopan, while Puerto Vallarta, Tonalá, Tlaquepaque, and Tonalá, came out better qualified during the second quarter of the year, according to the National Survey of Urban Public Safety of the National Institute of Geography and Statistics.

The highest percentage of people who feel safe in their Jalisco city was Puerto Vallarta. The perception of insecurity decreased from 57.4 to 43.1%, meaning 56.9% of the population consider Puerta Vallarta as a safe place to live. This is Puerto Vallarta’s highest ranking since the quarterly surveys started.

According to INEGI data, during the first quarter Guadalajara had a perception of 80.2 percent, while last June, the perception of insecurity increased to 85.0%. In Zapopan, the perception rose from 68.6 to 70.6 percent.

Tonalá had a perception of insecurity in 85.1% of the population during the first three months of the year and dropped to 76.6 in the second quarter.

Tlajomulco decreased from 72.8 to 65.0 percent. In Tlaquepaque, the perception of insecurity was also reduced from 80.2 to 72.6 percent.

According to the most recent National Survey of Urban Public Safety (ENSU), seven out of 10 people perceive the city where they live as insecure, at a percentage of 73.9% of Mexicans feel insecure.

The cities in Mexico where people consider that living is more insecure are: Ecatepec (State of Mexico) 97%; Coatzacoalcos (Veracruz) 94%; Naucalpan (State of Mexico) 94%; Villahermosa (Tabasco) 92%, and Tapachula (Chiapas) with 92.3%.

On the other hand, the cities with the least perception of insecurity were: San Pedro Garza García, Nuevo León (18.9), Mérida, Yucatán (30.2), San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León (31.5), Los Cabos, Baja California Sur ( 36.1), Durango (40.8) and Puerto Vallarta (43.1%).

The survey does not take into account actual crime statistics and is not a guide to determine the security or insecurity of any destination in Mexico.

From simple hotels to luxurious resorts the Vallarta Tribune has collected many of the available daypass details so you can relax poolside from Punta Mita to Mismaloya

Hi to all of our readers!

As a person that lives here year round, I have over-looked the amazing opportunities that exist here for a stay-cation or something a little more or even just a day trip to a local resort for much earned rest and relaxation.

I have attached a day pass guide, created by the Vallarta Tribune.

The costs run from as little to 5 USD to much, much more, but the options are numerous.

Please share this with your friends and family.

Gracias!

 

Todd Bates

Owner/Broker

Puerto Vallarta RE/MAX