A trip to Mazatlán changed the life of this expat from California

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Surfer and former publisher Janet Blaser.

A trip to Mazatlán changed the life of this expat from California

Janet Blaser enjoys the Mexican lifestyle and has no plans to move back to the US

A trip to Mazatlán changed the life of a California woman who has now been living in the Sinaloa resort city for more than a decade and can’t imagine moving back to the United States.

Janet Blaser, formerly a food and restaurant writer in Santa Cruz, California, moved to Mazatlán in 2006 after she lost one journalism job and had her hours cut back at another as a result of the rise in popularity of online news.

A trip to the Pacific coast city in Mexico served as the impetus for her relocation decision.

“I fell in love, I felt this heart connection somehow — there were beautiful old buildings, cobblestone streets, plazas with wrought iron and the beautiful glittering Pacific Ocean, warm and swimmable,” Blaser told the financial information website MarketWatch.

“It just felt deeply healing, friendly and welcoming,” she added.

Another reason for Blaser’s move was that she spotted an interesting opportunity.

There were a lot of English-speaking expats and tourists in town but little information about Mazatlán’s social and cultural life and Blaser’s journalistic experience and ingenuity could fix that.

So in 2006, the writer and surfing enthusiast packed up her car and set her sights on starting a new life in northern Mexico. A plan to move to New Orleans was put on the backburner.

Blaser admitted to having doubts about the move but knew that staying in California would stretch her budget and leave her with an uncertain future.

During her first year in Mazatlán, Blaser worked part time as an online editor as she planned how to start an arts and entertainment publication that would provide information to the English-speaking residents of the city and the tourists who visit.

In 2007, she launched M! Magazine and continued to run the successful publication for nine years. In the same period, Blaser started a local organic farmers’ market.

The 63-year-old is now retired but remains busy: she has just published a book entitled Why We Left: An Anthology of American Women Expats, in which 27 essays of women living happily in Mexico are compiled.

Even though her magazine publishing days are over, Blaser is not thinking about relocating north of the border even though she says she misses her three adult children and three grandkids, all of whom live in the United States.

“I can’t imagine living in the U.S. again,” she told MarketWatch, explaining that the cheaper cost of living in Mexico – Blaser lives on about US $1,000 a month – was one but not the only reason why.

“I couldn’t afford to live in the States again” Blaser said before adding that she prefers the “easygoing Mexican lifestyle” in any case.

“It’s a very different vibe here that’s kind of hard to explain. It’s not about being retired, because I wasn’t that until a year ago. It’s just a different understanding of what’s important in life, and a more relaxed live-and-let-live attitude. If something doesn’t get done today, there’s always tomorrow, or the next day. What’s the big deal?” she said.

“. . . I’m able to actually live a more simple life and be satisfied in a way I could never before in the U.S.”

Source: MarketWatch (en)

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La Campana, Jalisco’s ‘Psychedelic Bell,’ is a jewel of natural beauty

La Campana, a bizarre little mountain.La Campana, a bizarre little mountain.

La Campana, Jalisco’s ‘Psychedelic Bell,’ is a jewel of natural beauty

As you walk up the smooth, undulating surface you come upon one strange, sweeping shape after another

Highway 70 could be called “the adventurous way” to travel from Guadalajara to Puerto Vallarta.

This road takes you past the legendary mining town of Guachinangowith its shimmering church covered with a million shards of broken porcelain plates, past Atenguillo, famed for its rustic raicilla distilleries hidden in the hills.

The highway then passes near Talpa with its celebrated maple forest, which has been around since the Pleistocene, through Mascota, renowned for its majestic casonas (mansions) with walls a meter thick, and on past San Sebastián del Oeste, the gorgeous mountain village “forgotten by time,” finally arriving at Puerto Vallarta, six hours distant.

There are so many picturesque towns along this route through western Jalisco that most travelers whiz right by a true jewel of natural beauty and surely the most bizarre little mountain I’ve seen anywhere in the world: La Campana (“the bell”).

The local people call it “The Bell” because that’s what it looks like when you glimpse it — for all of two seconds — as you zoom around one of a hundred curves on the ever-twisting highway approaching Mascota.

From the highway it looks like a bell.
From the highway it looks like a bell.

This spot is a two-hour drive from Guadalajara and at this point your stomach is probably growling and you can almost smell the tantalizing aromas awaiting you at the excellent Navidad restaurant in Mascota. What could I ever say to convince you to pull off the highway onto a little dirt road barely visible among the tall pine trees?

Well, if you drive down that road only 20 meters, step out of your car and gaze upward, I know you’re going to be hooked. With only a bit of imagination you might swear you were looking at a very bizarre sculpture of a giant puma battling a gargantuan hammerhead shark.

“Well, well, that definitely does look interesting,” is the reaction I have heard from every soul I have coaxed into stopping here. No matter how loudly their stomachs were growling, they would inevitably ask, “How long do I have to walk to go see it?”

When I tell them it’s only five minutes to the base of La Campana, believe it or not, curiosity always wins out over hunger, and off we go to visit what I call “The Psychedelic Bell.”

After that short walk, you suddenly step out of the forest on bare volcanic rock. As you walk up the smooth, undulating surface, you come upon one after another strange, sweeping shapes you’d swear must have been sculpted by Antonio Gaudí or Salvador Dalí. Who else would put frozen waves of rock on top of a mountain? Of course, instead of breaking waves, you may see something quite different.

Whatever the case, please watch your step. There are no guard rails or rangers here to protect you and a false step could be fatal.  It’s not a hike for small children unless you’re carrying them in your backpack.

Owner of La Campana, Tino López, is always ready to guide visitors up the mountain.
Owner of La Campana, Tino López, is always ready to guide visitors up the mountain.

After soaking up this semi-psychedelic view, feast your eyes on the panorama below stretching into the distance. No matter how you felt when you started up the mountain, by the time you reach the top, you will surely be inundated with good vibrations! The length of this walk, by the way, is only 428 meters from your car to the peak of the hill.

I first stumbled upon La Campana some 30 years ago. Seeing so many smooth, clean, sweeping, baby-pink surfaces, I couldn’t help but wonder how long they would remain in that pristine state. But every time I have returned, including very recently, I have found the mountain free of trash and the wave-like formations entirely free of graffiti.

Credit for this must surely go to the local landowner, Tino López, whom we first met years ago when we stepped out of our cars and were hailed by a friendly voice — in English, mind you:

“Welcome! Do you want to visit La Campana?”

Don Tino then showed us the short and easy route to the base of the mountain, which we continue to use today. “My house is close by,” he reminded us before leaving. “Just tell people to shout my name when they arrive, and I’ll be glad to guide them.”

Another reason why La Campana is in such good condition — and the surrounding forest free of wildfires — is because the local headquarters of Conafor, the National Forestry Commission, is located only a few meters above the spot where you parked your car and the rangers are always vigilant.

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      Another view of La Campana.
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If you are interested in camping, there’s a nice flat area — no facilities of any kind — 500  meters east of the gate (at N20.37170 W104.59058). But a high-clearance vehicle may be needed to reach the spot. In the rainy season you’ll find a small brook next to your tent.

One advantage of camping is that you could visit La Campana both early and late in the day, when the light gives it very different looks. And don’t be surprised if you scare up a deer or two as you hike from the campsite to the peak.

If you’d like to visit “The Psychedelic Bell,” ask Google Maps to take you to “La Campana, Atenguillo, Jalisco.” Upon arriving, you will see a sign saying Puerto La Campana. Continue past the sign and make a very sharp right turn onto an easy-to-miss dirt road.

A few meters from the highway you can park in front of an iron gate. Just a few meters past the gate, look for the start of a trail on your right. Walk east uphill and you will soon be on an ever-more-obvious path that takes you directly to the base of the little mountain.

If you go up there with children, be sure to keep them tightly in hand because a strong gust of wind could blow a child right over the edge.

Enjoy the good vibrations!

The writer has lived near Guadalajara, Jalisco, for more than 30 years and is the author of A Guide to West Mexico’s Guachimontones and Surrounding Area and co-author of Outdoors in Western Mexico. More of his writing can be found on his website.

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Frolicking in the mud at Los Negritos, a natural wonder in Michoacán

Mexico Life
Locals say there are about 15 pools of boiling mud at Los Negritos.Locals say there are about 15 pools of boiling mud at Los Negritos.

Frolicking in the mud at Los Negritos, a natural wonder in Michoacán

Restorative mud pots and ‘fools’ fire’ at Los Negritos Lake near Lake Chapala

Anywhere else, Los Negritos Lake would have been turned into a recreational area and its curative and beautifying mud pots into an expensive spa.

But in El Platanal, Michoacán, the local people seem content to keep their natural wonders as they are rather than “developing” them.

If you happen to live anywhere near Lake Chapala, you should note that Los Negritos is practically in your back yard. If you love nature, you’ll be fascinated by the strange shapes and noises of its boiling mud pots and, if you suffer from arthritis, you may find an inexpensive — albeit dirty — possible solution to your problem.

I first heard about Los Negritos from José Luis Zavala, a biologist studying the fish in the area. He explained that this lagoon is unique because it contains all the aquatic creatures that used to be found in Lake Chapala.

“Laguna Los Negritos is actually hydraulically connected to Chapala,” said Zavala, “but it hasn’t been polluted. It’s a perfect laboratory for studying what Lake Chapala must have been like years ago.”

Four friends having fun in the mud.
Four friends having fun in the mud.

The lake is rumored to be 700 meters deep, but Zavala calls this a myth.

Tall shade trees and several roofed kiosks make the laguna shore an ideal picnic spot and the mud pots are located only 400 meters northwest of the lake, easy to reach on foot over perfectly flat ground.

The mud is black as black can be and the boiling pots are mostly less than a meter in diameter. So “Los Negritos” (The Little Black Ones) is a fitting name for the place. We came upon at least a dozen boiling, hissing, plopping mud pots interspersed with small bogs and occasional wallowing holes filled with cool mud that would bring joy to the heart of any hedonistic porker.

So much moisture, of course, has brought lots of birds to this area and you can see vermillion flycatchers, golden-fronted woodpeckers, house finches, egrets and if you’re lucky you may even spot a white owl.

“Lots of people have drowned in the lake,” a local rancher told us, apparently because it drops straight down from the shoreline with no shallow spots for waders. He said a few people have drowned in some of the cool mud pools whose rims look far more solid than they really are.

However, he assured us that there are great benefits from getting up to your neck in mud, particularly if you suffer from arthritis. One must, however, be careful not to confuse the cool mud with the hot sort.

Los Negritos Lake is connected to Lake Chapala, but is said to be clean.
Los Negritos Lake is connected to Lake Chapala, but is said to be clean.

“One of my horses sank into what seemed to be cool mud and the heat was so intense, the poor horse lost two of its hooves,” explained the ranchero.

Our informant also told us that geysers sometimes shoot several meters into the air, but when and where this might occur is impossible to predict. Finally, our rancher friend said it may be worth staying overnight among the mud pots because occasionally they produce “big green flames.”

We imagined this must refer to the legendary will o’ the wisp or ignis fatuus (fool’s fire), a ghostly light said to hover over bogs, supposedly leading one either to rich treasures or perdition. Science tells us the phenomenon is the result of gases released by decaying organic matter, an explanation that’s not nearly as much fun.

When my friend Mario Guerrero told me he was going camping at Lake Negritos, I asked him to check out those green flames. A few days later, he sent me the following message. I think it nicely captures the flavor of many weekend excursions in Mexico. Tongue in cheek, he described his trip as “nothing special or unusual.”

“You asked me how our trip to Los Negritos went and I can report that it was todo sin novedad (nothing special).

“We started out fine in the morning in two vehicles, but when we stopped to pick up our compañeros, one of the cars refused to start. However, by pushing it, we finally got it going.

The thick black mud is said to cure all sorts of ailments, especially arthritis.
The thick black mud is said to cure all sorts of ailments, especially arthritis.

“A few hours later, about half a kilometer from Villamar — the closest town to Los Negritos — my own car suddenly died. It was the gas pump — totally shot. So, we had to tow it to Villamar using my friend’s car which, unfortunately, again refused to start.

“However, we push-started it . . . and got to Villamar where we found only one mechanic and he was hopelessly drunk. However, he staggered over to my car, looked at the pump, said he could fix it, but declared that there was no way to get a new one the same day because the spare parts store was closed.

“So, we left my car . . . and told him he should fix it as soon as he sobered up. ‘Just leave me money for the pump,’ he replied, ‘and a bottle of tequila.’

“Then all six of us piled into the other car. It was pretty crowded . . . .

“Finally, we arrived at Los Negritos at 10:00pm It was so dark we couldn’t see a thing, not even the lake. All we wanted to do by then was hit the sack. We went to the first kiosk, but what did we find in the middle of it but a big coral snake about two meters long.

“. . . we chased it away, but nobody in the group wanted to sleep in that particular kiosk anymore, so we went off in the dark looking for another one. Like I said, nothing ‘unusual’ about this trip.

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      Testing out the beautifying powers of the black mud of Los Negritos.
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“. . . we set up our tents inside the next kiosk and now it was about midnight. Then I remembered I promised to check out those mud pots for you. Well, I had the GPS coordinates, so we had no choice but to traipse off into the darkness looking for them.

“Since we couldn’t see where we were going, we ended up walking through mud so thick and sticky it soon looked like we had cannonballs at the ends of our legs. Finally, we found the mud pots, turned off our lights and discovered absolutely nothing: no green flames, no mysteries, no ghosts. In fact, once again nothing unusual.

“. . . two hours later we finally crawled into our tents — when all hell broke loose.

“A hurricane-like wind hit us and suddenly the surface of the lake was churning with monster waves. We had to jump on top of our tents to hold them down. I swear that wind was blowing over 200 kilometers per hour, but it finally weakened a bit and at last we were getting ready to go to bed when — it started to rain.

“Well, the wind was still blowing pretty hard and, therefore, we had rain coming at us horizontally. The roof of the kiosk wasn’t doing us any good at all and in a few minutes all of us and our gear were soaking wet . . . We didn’t get to sleep until 3:00am. It was just another one of those nights — nothing special at all.

“The next day we found the mechanic as drunk as ever, but the new gas pump was installed perfectly.

Mud pots at Lago Los Negritos

“On our way home we stopped at a taco stand under a canopy and what happened? While we were eating, another sudden downpour hits us — more horizontal rain — and we walked out of the ‘restaurant’ soaked again.

“Finally, at 11:00pm we arrived home after a rather long weekend but, gracias a Dios, a weekend sin novedad, with nothing special to report.”

To visit Los Negritos — if my friend’s report doesn’t dissuade you — ask Google Maps for directions to “Lago Los Negritos, Michoacán.” The mud pots are located at N20.06285 W102.61573 and yes, you can input these coordinates into Google Maps.

If you prefer old-fashioned directions, see Volume One of Outdoors in Western Mexico. Driving time from the town of Ajijic on Lake Chapala is just over two hours.

The writer has lived near Guadalajara, Jalisco, for more than 30 years and is the author of A Guide to West Mexico’s Guachimontones and Surrounding Area and co-author of Outdoors in Western Mexico. More of his writing can be found on his website.

RIVIERA NAYARIT RENEWS ITS BLUE FLAG CERTIFICATIONS

Blue Flag designation (about cleanliness and services) is very difficult to get and we are proud of the beaches that have attained and maintained that!

The Puerto Vallarta continues to invest in our environment and to maximize the enjoyment of our natural resources, for both owners and visitors.

RIVIERA NAYARIT RENEWS ITS BLUE FLAG CERTIFICATIONS

On Monday, July 15, 2019, Blue Flag certificates were awarded to the beach at Nuevo Vallarta Norte and the Marina Riviera Nayarit during a ceremony headed by Miguel Torruco Marqués, Mexico’s Secretary of Tourism, and Antonio Echeverría García, Governor of the State of Nayarit. Both venues are in the municipality of Bahía de Banderas in the Riviera Nayarit. The Lagoon at Santa María del Oro (municipality of Santa María del Oro), and the Marina Fonatur San Blas (municipality of San Blas) are also within the Riviera Nayarit.

The event took place at the Marina Fonatur in the Historic Port of San Blas, where they raised the corresponding flag. This occasion marked the first time the marina received this international certification.

Thanks to these credentials, the state of Nayarit has become an example for the nation. According to Torruco Marqués, this “speaks to the commitment the tourism service providers and the community have with the environment.”

He stated that over the next three decades, people would have more free time and more income. Therefore, “those nations that best preserve their environment and, above all, conserve their historical, cultural, and culinary identity, will be the ones who will participate fully in the extraordinary economic revenue generated by tourism.”

Ana Cecilia Llanos Guzmán, Secretary of Tourism of the State of Nayarit, also made a distinguished appearance at the event, along with the municipal presidents of Bahía de Banderas, Jaime Cuevas Tello, and Candy Yescas, from San Blas.

The Foundation for Environmental Education (FEE) sets the protocols for Blue Flag certifications. Joaquín Díaz Ríos, executive director for the entity’s Mexico chapter, offered the explanatory statements: The main criteria taken into account for this award are water quality, environmental education and management, safety, and services.

Of note is the fact the certification is valid for one year. Because of this, at the end of every summer the beaches are up for recertification after an exhaustive evaluation.

MORE INFO:

+ According to statistics offered by the Ministry of Tourism, Mexico is first in line in Latin America as to the number of Blue Flags received and in 13th place worldwide.

+ Currently, 54 beaches and three marinas in 13 municipalities and six states in Mexico have the certification: Baja California Sur, Nayarit, Jalisco, Guerrero, Oaxaca, and Quintana Roo.

+ The Riviera Nayarit received its first Blue Flag for the beach at Nuevo Vallarta Norte in 2013, which has maintained its certification since then.

+ The Marina Riviera Nayarit in La Cruz de Huanacaxtle received its Blue Flag in 2015, the first of its kind to receive this international award.

+ The lagoon at Santa María del Oro raised its first Blue Flag in August of 2016.

 

DISCOVER 5 GLAMPING SPOTS IN VALLARTA · NAYARIT

DISCOVER 5 GLAMPING SPOTS IN VALLARTA · NAYARIT

Estefanía Montes

Jun. 19, 2019
430 views

Vallarta · Nayarit offers diverse places for demanding travelers with a like for exploring new natural environments, without losing style and comfort, through ecological spaces which promote glamping.

Glamping is an experience that combines glamour + camping, so you can reconnect with yourself in a more private and personalized environment, all while in harmony with Mother Earth. For this reason, we bring you a selection of 5 glamping spots in the region.

Verana

This place is located south of Puerto Vallarta, in the picturesque town of Yelapa, where the only access is through the ocean. Due to this, it has the privilege of being immersed in the mountains, and having its own private beach.

There, you will find your personal refuge which will allow you to breath in pure air, witness the most spectacular sunsets, and illuminate your nights with stars, while you listen to the murmur of the sea.

Verana has 10 rustic installations made of different materials, each one with its own unique style, and all the necessary features to make your stay most pleasant. To complement this, you may savor the culinary delicacies that the chef of the place offers, so you can then walk along the edge of the beach, and end your day in the relaxing spa.

5 glamping spots in vallarta · nayarit

Vereda Palapa

 North of Yelapa, you will find Vereda Palapa, a place that offers a revitalizing experience through an ecological stay which combines the sound of the channel where the river flows, and the soft breeze of the wind.

Vereda Palapa is composed of four palapas with very tropical names, as well as a garden which shelters flowers and fruits representative of the region, a gallery (where you may find different art pieces like paintings and sculptures inspired on animals and the human body), a kitchen, and a very peculiar pool, through which a small creek flows.

 5 glamping spots in vallarta · nayarit

Xinalani Retreat

 Between Las Ánimas and Yelapa is Xinalani Retreat, an intimate natural sanctuary which serves to delight the senses, and at the same time helps you enter a state of peace.

This site offers luxurious houses and palapas walled on three sides, with a palm ceiling, and in front of each room, there is a large window which is always open to be able to observe everything around you. It permits the moon to light your nights, and for you to awaken with the first rays of sunshine. Let yourself be spoiled at the spa, stretch, and strengthen your body in the diverse yoga rooms, enjoy the beach club, and try the delicious treats offered at the restaurant and bar.

5 glamping spots in vallarta · nayarit

Playa Escondida

Towards the north of the Banderas Bay, in Sayulita, you can find Playa Escondida, a spot which will seduce you with its incredible view. At the beach you can have long walks while you listen to the relaxing sound of the waves and birds. You can conclude your day tasting the gourmet flavors which are offered at the site’s restaurant.

This place has different palapas distributed along a jungle-like terrain, close to a private beach. Due to its distribution, depending on the cabin that you choose, you can be a few steps away from the ocean, or contemplate it from the heights, among a natural green curtain. Furthermore, you will find amenities such as a bar, restaurant, pool, spa, yoga room, and even, a jacuzzi and hammocks in certain cabins.

5 glamping spots in vallarta · nayarit

Aldea Bamboo

In San Pancho, you may leave your worries behind as you near Aldea Bamboo, a spot immersed in a paradise in the middle of the jungle. Let yourself strengthen your ties with Mother Earth, as you are surrounded by abundant foliage.

The three octagonal wooden cabins that this site offers are integrally equipped so your stay is as comfortable, and peaceful as possible. At night, you may contemplate the starlight, and the moon from a small dome located in the center of the upper cover.

5 glamping spots in vallarta · nayarit

Without a doubt, in any of these spots you will live a unique experience to get a breather, enjoy nature, and reconnect with yourself.

PUERTO VALLARTA IS THE BEST ALTERNATIVE TO THE SARGASSUM INVASION OF THE CARIBBEAN

PUERTO VALLARTA IS THE BEST ALTERNATIVE TO THE SARGASSUM INVASION OF THE CARIBBEAN

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Sargassum is a dark- colored seaweed that is dispersed by ocean currents through the Atlantic, which, when they reach the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean, find the perfect opportunity for their waste to coagulate, forming what scholars call garbage patches, and which have invaded the Caribbean coast of Mexico and now threatens Africa and Europe.

The invasion of sargassum to the Caribbean coast of Mexico is motivating travelers to search for other destinations in Mexico.

In the Pacific, such as Puerto Vallarta and Riviera Nayarit, you will find the perfect alternative. In addition to an extensive range of beaches, the area has activities for all tourist segments: family, LGBT, pet-friendly, weddings, adventures and foodies, among others.

Puerto Vallarta is one of the most important beach destinations in Mexico, located in the State of Jalisco, the birthplace of Tequila, Mariachi and Charra culture, recognized as Heritage by UNESCO.

This destination harbors the tradition and colors of Mexico through its squares, streets and its people, named the friendliest city in the world by the magazine Conde Nast Traveler.

The place offers travelers natural, cultural, historical and gastronomic delights, thanks to its wide range of restaurants, and is considered the second mecca for foodies in Mexico for its cuisine of the sea, mountain, and international flavors.

The traveler will find a sea of ​​activities throughout the day, sophisticated amenities, a wide range of hotels, excellent weather, festivals celebrating music, and gastronomy.

The other jewel of the Mexican Pacific, Riviera Nayarit, is just 10 minutes from the Gustavo Díaz Ordaz International Airport in Puerto Vallarta. It is famous for its eclectic charm and luxury hotel, virtues that have given it international recognition.

Located in the Mexican state of Nayarit, the region offers 309 kilometers of beaches with crystal clear waters on the Pacific coast, the wonderful mountains of the Sierra Madre, the spectacular Bay of Banderas and endless protected natural wonders.

The Riviera Nayarit houses the tourist center of Nuevo Vallarta, the historic town of San Blas, the exclusive refuge of celebrities in Punta Mita, the “boho-chic” surfing mecca in Sayulita, and a variety of picturesque fishing villages.

There are plenty of activities that range from golf courses, zip lines, diving, and surfing, to bird watching, whale watching, and turtle release programs.

Accommodations range from luxury resorts and all-inclusive establishments that target families, to boutique hotels and all kinds of options.

Riviera Nayarit has four hotels that have the distinguished AAA rating of five diamonds, 11 AAA four-distinguished AAA rating of five diamonds, 11 AAA four- diamond hotels and 13 AAA three-diamond hotels.

The AAA Diamon Award is awarded by the American Automobile Association (AAA) to hotels and restaurants in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean, and guarantees that the establishment offers the highest standards of luxury, quality and high-level service.

Photo by @jeniferwhalen

30,000 homes will use electricity generated by new solar plant

The inauguration of new solar plant in Progreso, Yucatán.The inauguration of new solar plant in Progreso, Yucatán.

30,000 homes will use electricity generated by new solar plant

Yucatán predicted to be self-sufficient in renewable energy in 3-4 years

A new solar plant in Yucatán has the capacity to produce up to 18 megawatts of electricity and serve up to 5.3% of the state’s households.

The San Ignacio solar plant, which covers 66 hectares in the municipality of Progreso, was inaugurated Friday by Governor Mauricio Vila Dosal. The Chinese company Jinko Solar invested US $30 million to build the plant.

Energy generated by the plant will be consumed in Progreso and the state capital, Mérida.

Speaking at the inauguration, Governor Vila said he hopes Yucatán will continue to invest in renewable energy infrastructure.

“With this kind of action, we’re putting Yucatán on the map as a destination for investment,” he said. “We’re going to keep promoting our state in Mexico and around the world, and above all, we’re going to keep making renewable energy projects a priority.”

Vila added that in addition to the San Ignacio plant, 24 other renewable energy projects are under way in Yucatán, representing investment of as much as $4.5 billion.

“Yucatán consumes 900 megawatts, and I calculate that in three or four years, we will be generating 3,400 megawatts of clean energy,” he said. “We would be the only state in the country to be self-sufficient, and generating more renewable energy than we consume.”

Manuel Mendizábal Quemada, head of Jinko Solar in Mexico, told the newspaper Diario de Yucatán that the company has plans for another plant in state.

“We’re about to start construction on another plant, in Valladolid, which will be bigger,” he said. “We’re investing $100 million in it, and it will generate 79 megawatts of renewable energy. Those are all the plans we have at the moment, but we could build even more plants in the future.”

Mendizábal explained that the San Ignacio plant uses “tracker” technology, which allows its 71,000 panels to follow the light of the sun and absorb more energy.

Founded in 2006, Jinko Solar is the biggest solar panel company in the world. Mexico is Jinko’s second-largest export market, representing over 10% of the company’s total revenue.

Source: El Universal (sp), El Diario de Yucatán (sp), Milenio (sp)

Our Latest Community Clean-Up Event; in Emiliano Zapata on June 1, 2019

This Saturday morning, June 1 from 10 am to Noon, our RE/MAX team and the public are getting together at the corner of Aguacate and Manuel Dieguez in Emiliano Zapata, El Centro.

We will meet at there and do some great community work; for our communities, that have given us so much!

We will supply the trash bags, gloves, water and snacks. Bring a hat and wear sunscreen.  Please come and show your support for a clean and healthy community!

Thanks!!

Todd Bates

RIVERS, ANOTHER ALTERNATIVE FOR THIS SEASON

RIVERS, ANOTHER ALTERNATIVE FOR THIS SEASON

Estefania Montes

May. 15, 2019
114 views

Going to the beach or the water parks are the first considered options for most of the people during this season, specially if we talk about a destination such as Puerto Vallarta. However, there are some other alternatives for freshen yourself and spending incredible moments full of adventures and fun with your family, friends or couple.

This time we will bring you three waterfalls and rivers that you can try, for walking, enjoying the fresh air and swim.

Palo Maria

If you consider yourself an adventurous spirit, and you like challenges and ecotourism a good option for you is to go Palo Santa Maria. There, you will find small waterfalls while you hike through the Sierra Madre Occidental. The only way to arrive to this place is by walking one path that will challenge you, because you will have to hike trough the middle of the jungle over rocky pathways, with small cascades and some shallow rivers. It could be tempting to stay in one of these small rivers, but if you continue walking, every step you make will be worthy. Just imagine that in the middle of the trees, there is a great waterfall that falls on a natural deep clear water pool where you can high dive and peacefully settle there. It is advised to bring food, because you won’t find any restaurants nearby once you start this journey.

Rivers, another alternative for this season

Paso Ancho

The road to Paso Ancho demands less physical effort, because it is a known Puerto Vallarta’s neighborhood. There you will find more constructions as you pass by a rustic path that will take you to one of the most popular rivers of the city. You can walk or use a vehicle to arrive. At the beginning of the journey you will notice the presence of some buildings, but as long as you continue and approach the river you will see less constructions and more nature.  Once you see the river, it will be your decision keep walking for a better location or just go there and jump into the water. Inside the river you will find some small cascades and big stones. An also fresh, clear and shallow waters.

Paso Ancho is an ideal place to see rustic and pictorial landscapes, where the human being and the nature can harmoniously coexist. It is optional to bring food, because during the journey you will find some restaurants and food vendors.

Rivers, another alternative for this season

Foto por Canopy River

El Eden

 If you like to explore new places and be surrounded by nature without leaving the comfort, El Eden would be the perfect place for you. To this paradise you can arrive by vehicle or walking through a rustic long well defined path, where you will be able to fill your lungs with the pure and fresh air.

Once you arrive you will see the helicopter used on the movie “The Predator” and even it will be possible for you to closely admire the figure that was used as the terrible creature. This is because this was the scenario for some of the action shoots of the film.

Beside this, at El Eden you could admire some watercourses sliding among huge stones that create a shallow natural pool with nature around it. Activate your senses by walking through the place, let your self go in the crystal clear water of this paradise and conclude your day tasting the delicious gastronomy that the place’s restaurant has for you. This is an ideal site to take a break and fill yourself with the nature’s good vibes.

Rivers, another alternative for this season

Foto por Los Veranos Canopy Tour

PUERTO VALLARTA’S BOTANICAL GARDEN PLACES 5TH IN USA TODAY’S BEST GARDENS

PUERTO VALLARTA’S BOTANICAL GARDEN PLACES 5TH IN USA TODAY’S BEST GARDENS

The Vallarta Botanical Garden (www.vbgardens.org) in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, has been voted into the fifth-place spot among all botanical gardens in North America in USA Today’s 10Best Readers’ Choice 2019.

Although the list has been dominated by gardens in the U.S., the Vallarta Botanical Garden has placed twice, first in 2018 when it became the third international botanical garden to place on the list, ranking in at number 4 and this year when it placed at number 5. Montreal’s Botanical Garden also placed in this year’s list coming in at number 10.

“We congratulate the Vallarta Botanical Garden on this honor as it represents part of the grand flora and fauna found in Puerto Vallarta,” said Javier Aranda Pedrero, Director of the Puerto Vallarta Tourism Board. “Puerto Vallarta is a lush destination, green, where we respect the Sierra Madre Mountains and the Bay of Banderas. We invite our visitors to experience the many ecological adventures offered in Puerto Vallarta, including the Estero el Salado and Los Arcos National Park.”

USA Today’s 10Best Readers’ Choice 2019 Best Botanical Gardens in North America are initially selected by a panel of experts who voted on the top 20 botanical gardens, and then the final top 10 were determined by popular vote at the 10Best website — including Sherry Boswell (Travel Plans in Mom Hands), Cindy Brockway (The Trustees), Abby Meyer (Botanic Gardens Conservation International-U.S.), Nicky Omohundro (Little Family Adventure) and Katy Moss Warner (American Horticultural Society) Eileen Ogintz (Taking the Kids) who has worked with the Puerto Vallarta Tourism Board to promote the destination’s offering previously.

For more information on Vallarta Botanical Garden, please visit https://www.vbgardens.org

About Vallarta Botanical Garden

Vallarta Botanical Garden is a not-for-profit organization started in 2004 with the mission to propagate, study, discover, conserve and display native plants from Mexico and from around the world. The garden sits on 20 acres of land and is home to a vast diversity of Mexican plant species, including the most visited public collection of orchids in Mexico. There are four conservatories showcasing local and exotic flowers from all over the world, plus vanilla, chocolate and coffee plantations; a museum; a rock collection; and a population of hummingbirds and other wild birds. The Los Horcones River, offering breathtaking views, runs alongside the property, which is also home to award-winning restaurant Hacienda de Oro.