PUERTO VALLARTA AMONG THE BEST CITIES IN THE WORLD TO VISIT

You have so many reasons to decide about your happiness, other than the persons telling you not to do it…

Just choose to be happy in your own skin!

You are amazing and so is Puerto Vallarta.

Puerto Vallarta has been recognized as one of the 10 Best Cities of the World to Visit Outside United States, in the category Small Cities, according to Condé Nast Traveler 32º Reader’s Choice Awards.

Our beautiful destination was granted 5th position due to its natural attributes, its powerful energy, attractive activities for the whole family, and other qualities that meet in the corner of the Bay.

Puerto Vallarta is one of the three Mexican cities that are part of the 40 Most Important Cities of the Worldand one of the two that appear among the 20 Best Small Cities. In fact, our destination is the only Mexican beach city that appears in both lists.

“We feel really honored to be part of this exclusive list of international cities. We think that this is the result of the charm that people of Puerto Vallarta offer and the diversity of attractions that can be enjoyed here”, mentioned Javier Aranda, general director of the Fideicomiso de Turismo de Puerto Vallarta.

This year, more than 600 thousand readers worldwide were in charge of rating and sharing their experiences about their favorite places. This is the complete list of the 10 Best Small Cities of the World to Visit:

 

10. Cologne, Germany

9. Monte Carlo, Monaco
8. Puebla, Mexico
7. Florence, Italy
6. Bergen, Norway
5. Puerto Vallarta, Mexico
4. Salzburg, Austria
3. Quebec City, Canada
2. Dresden, Germany
1. Mérida, Mexico

Todd Bates​
#remaxinpv
#puertovallartaremax
#remaxsitesmarina
#remaxdestiny

Turtle Release and Beach Clean up, Oct 26, 2019

Dear customers and friends,

I invite you to join, as every year, you and your family or friends to this volunteer to help the ENVIRONMENT… Monex Bank invites you to:

Beach cleaning, and turtle release this time!
Date: SATURDAY 26 OCTOBER, 4.30PM (see more information in the postcard below)
Meeting point: Soriana Playa de Oro
I appreciate your confirmation please before this Friday, October 11, to register them with name, if you are an adult or child, and size to request your shirts and caps.

Hopefully you can join us, remember: It has no cost, nor do you have to bring anything, just your enthusiasm and participation!

Limited space, please confirm full name, adult and / or child, and size for your shirts.
Any doubt I am at your service,

Regards!

Estimados clientes y amigos,

 

Los invito a sumarse como cada año a ustedes y su familia o amigos a este voluntariado para ayudar al MEDIO AMBIENTE  …Banco Monex los invita a :

 

  • Limpieza de playa, y liberación de tortugas  en esta ocasión!
  • Fecha:  SABADO 26 OCTUBRE, 4.30PM ( anexo  mas datos en la postal  abajo)
  • Punto reunión : Soriana Playa de Oro

 

 

Agradezco su confirmación por favor antes de este viernes 11 octubre , para inscribirlos con nombre , si es adulto o niño , y talla  para poder solicitar sus playeras y gorras.

 

Ojala puedan acompañarnos , recuerden : No tiene costo,  ni tienen que traer nada , solo su entusiasmo y participación ¡!

 

  • Cupo limitado, favor de confirmar nombre completo, adulto y/ o niño , y talla  para sus playeras..

 

Cualquier duda quedo a sus órdenes, ¡

 

Saludos!

 

 

” src=”blob:http://wordpress.point2.com/c37f0c00-8b12-42fc-98f2-13f92578fdb9″ alt=”image009.png” class=”Apple-web-attachment” style=”width: 1.3541in; height: 0.6875in; opacity: 1;”>

 

 

 

Síguenos:

Cynthia M Hermosillo Ch.

Director Sucursal Puerto Vallarta

 

 

Tel. 3222599000 Ext. 9002

Tel. Directo ha cambiado!!: 

322 2599002(marcando los 10 digitos

Nos cambiamos!                 Blvd. Fco.Medina Ascencio No.2485 Local SUB E-1  Plaza Peninsula , Zona Hotelera Norte,

C.P. 48330, Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco

” src=”blob:http://wordpress.point2.com/5045eb0a-4528-4393-a341-a443b6c99c1c” alt=”cid:image004.png@01D3F349.FC3F5ED0″ border=”0″ class=”Apple-web-attachment” style=”width: 0.3645in; height: 0.4062in; opacity: 1;”>” src=”blob:http://wordpress.point2.com/89b5f60a-639b-4e15-8de3-0b21950f5cc9″ alt=”image010.png” border=”0″ class=”Apple-web-attachment” style=”width: 0.375in; height: 0.4062in; opacity: 1;”>” src=”blob:http://wordpress.point2.com/ea6a85d0-5343-4963-b83a-b2249c519fe4″ alt=”cid:image007.png@01D3F349.FC3F5ED0″ border=”0″ class=”Apple-web-attachment” style=”width: 0.3645in; height: 0.4062in; opacity: 1;”>” src=”blob:http://wordpress.point2.com/9effea6b-a96a-45f8-8985-5f7b879a34f8″ alt=”cid:image008.png@01D3F349.FC3F5ED0″ border=”0″ class=”Apple-web-attachment” style=”width: 0.3645in; height: 0.4062in; opacity: 1;”> www.monex.com.mx

RE/MAX Puerto Vallarta’s Latest Community Service!

 Oct 5, 2019

I am so proud to share that our RE/MAX agents did another wonderful job of helping another, local community, to clean up garbage, as well as a few other things!

Our location was Independencia, a few kilometers south of Costco.  Many of the neighbors thanked us for our efforts and Lupita may even get a listing there.

Firstly, I would like to introduce our newest agent, Andrea Thompson.  Originally from Los Angeles, Andrea  moved to Puerto Vallarta a little over 2 years ago and now calls Vallarta her forever home!

The 12 persons that assisted are:

Greg Schell, Warren Brander, their children Kiana and Justin, Gerard Allard, Dana Scapa, Lupita Montano, Martha Lievano, Alex Breceda, Patricia Zuniga and me.

As usual, we started at 930 am and were finished by 1045 am.  We collected another 47 bags, 3 chairs and a baby jacuzzi!

If you, or friends or family are ever thinking about real estate in the Puerto Vallarta area, please remember the company that really cares and works for the community.

 Gracias!

Todd Bates

www.remaxinpv.com

#remaxinpv

#puertovallartaremax

#remaxsitesmarina

#remaxdestiny


Venture south of Puerto Vallarta for small inlets, quaint towns and beautiful beaches

Mayto beach: 'absolutely divine.'Mayto beach: ‘absolutely divine.’

Venture south of Puerto Vallarta for small inlets, quaint towns and beautiful beaches

Take a boat from Boca de Tomatlán to Yelapa and get off the beaten track

When director John Huston came to film The Night of the Iguana in 1963, Puerto Vallarta was just a sleepy little fishing village. A little Hollywood glamour, provided by the famous cast and scandalous and media-drenched affair between Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, and this little pueblo suddenly became an international beach hideaway for starlets and regular folks alike.

Palm-lined beaches, turquoise waters, brown sugar sand and a sultry year-round climate — there’s a lot to love in Puerto Vallarta.

Unbeknownst to a lot of travelers that beach-hop north – to the beaches of Punta Mita, Sayulita and San Francisco – Puerto Vallarta’s southern shores are dotted with delicious little inlets and a handful of quaint towns that boast some of the coast’s most beautiful beaches. It takes a little effort to get to these off-the-beaten track expanses of sand, but I think you’ll find it worth it once you arrive.

From Boca de Tomatlán to Yelapa

The road south out of central Puerto Vallarta is a jungle-lined trek past luxury hotels, public beach accesses and a half-dozen, half-built dream houses. Despite the constant construction, a dense fog of humidity and heat permeates everything, slowing even the most ambitious projects and most energetic tourists.

Along this road you’ll pass the now-closed Night of the Iguana hotel, and several exclusive housing developments in pre-sale before you reach the highway entrance to Boca de Tomatlán, a small village about 30 minutes down the coast. Whether you go by bus or by cab, it’s easy to find the town’s boat dock as you enter Boca’s small handful of streets. This is one of the bigger towns along this stretch of coast and the take-off point for the boat that takes you down the shoreline.

You’ll see handfuls of locals and Mexican tourists waiting for the next water taxi to set out. Boats to Yelapa leave every hour on the hour starting at 8:00am with an additional final boat at 6:30pm. Sounds prompt, but everything here is variable, so arrive with sunscreen and patience. The Yelapa taxi will drop you off at any of the beaches between Boca and Yelapa (about a 40-minute ride) but you have to ask the boat’s captain in advance.

Alternatively you can ask around to see which boats are going to the specific beach you want and you can often find someone leaving sooner and getting you there faster. There is a single walking path that will take you overland to both Animas beach and Quixmo beach but it is a long and hot walk. The boats are infinitely faster and more enjoyable. In the case of the water taxi you pay when you get off; a private boat ride requires you to set a price in advance.

I suggest riding the entire way to Yelapa to take a look at the beaches as you decide what suits your fancy. There is a first tiny, rocky-edged beach called Madagascar as you pass a palapa “house” on the edge of a cliff heading out from Boca. There is nothing here as far as amenities and not much shade, but it is an isolated pinpoint of a beach to drop anchor and swim for a bit.

A little farther down and you will see a short, palm-lined strip of beach that is absolutely lovely called El Caballo. This has little human presence to speak of although there are a few hotels on either end tucked up into the mountainside. Just past the rocky outcrop at the end of Caballo is Animas beach. Animas has a decent strip of beach and a long dock in the center.

This a popular beach for tourists because there are a couple of dozen restaurants that sit between the sand and the jungle backdrop. The water is nice but not as crystal clear and gorgeous blue as some of the others.

Morning in Yelapa.

Morning in Yelapa.

The next big beach is Quimixto, which you will recognize by the terracotta-roofed house that sits to one edge, almost in the water. This is a splendid beach for an afternoon, and many locals told me it was their favorite. There are a handful of restaurants and hotels but much fewer than at Animas.

Next is Caletas, which is the home to the Ritmo de Noches show put on by Vallarta Adventures at night. This was also the once home of director John Huston and the beach is absolutely adorable, even though there are just a few hotels and no restaurants open to the public. Majahuitas beach (the next down) is similar in that there are a few hotels but not much with open arms to the public. Still the beach is delicious and small.

Yelapa is next up, with an ample beach to one side of the town, home to about 1,500 people. Several restaurants, including the most famous, Fanny’s, sit center-stage on the beach and boats bob in the water near the town dock as many of the locals you see working in this area either live here or in Boca. Yelapa is a nice town to make your base if you’re comfortable depending on water taxis for transportation or paying exorbitant rates for private boats (someone quoted me US $70 an hour for a private ride).

The town has some nice hotels including Hotel Lagunita, Casa Pericos and others that sit along the edges of Yelapa’s tiny bay. The rock outcropping to the south end of the bay down the little coast to Playa Isabella has nice snorkeling.

Yelapa to Chimo

Twice daily from Yelapa runs a taxi that heads farther south down the coast to Chimo beach, about 30 minutes away. Again, beware of trusting timetables too much and always be early and prepare to wait. Catch the morning taxi to head to La Manzanilla, a minuscule beach that glitters like a jewel just 10 minutes down the coast by boat. There’s nothing there to distract from the beauty of the crystal-clear water but a shady palapa for picnics.

Manzanilla glitters like a jewel.

Manzanilla glitters like a jewel.

From Manzanilla you can walk south over the rocks (watch out for iguanas!) to the next beach ingeniously called Playa del Medio, or beach in the middle. This is another gorgeous little gem, and quiet, unless there is a rowdy yacht parked just off the coast like the day I was there.

From Playa del Medio you can walk along a cement path to Pizota, a small fishing village at the farthest end of this strip of beaches. Pizota has that same lovely water, but the beach is scattered with locals’ kayaks and canoes and the water with taxis and fishing boats. Most days you will have a little audience if you want to swim there as the local boat operators hang out in the shade near the edge of the beach, gabbing and drinking beers.

Pizota is a regular stop on the Chimo taxi’s route, but be sure to ask the taxi captain and not the locals what time they will be coming through – answers varied wildly and I ended up missing it altogether. There is a small convenience store on the edge of beach with some surly women running it – a fine place if you need to get a beer or water or snacks.

Inland and then out again

Too far to go by water (unless you have your own boat) there are a handful of places farther south, what is commonly called Costa Alegre, that I think you should know about.

Mayto beach is absolutely divine. The water makes a deep drop just past the sand-dune style coast, but while it looked rough, the day I went the waves were a joy. A single hotel sits on the beach, the Mayto Hotel (what else?), and they serve cheap beer and delicious food in an exclusive setting. This beach is starting to be on people’s lips, but it’s still so far out there (about an hour from the closest town of Tuito) that it’s yet to be overrun with tourists.

Playa del Medio is another gorgeous gem.

Playa del Medio is another gorgeous gem.

The day I went (albeit during the low season) there were only about six other people (and most of those eating at the hotel). The beach stretches lazily around a 12-kilometer bay that the staff of the Mayto says can have rougher waves in the winter season. There is no shade here so bring that umbrella or prepare to fry. There is a small tortoise refuge that releases turtles in the evening if you stick around. You can camp at the tortoise refuge for about $8 a person a night.

Once you make it out to Mayto you can hop down the coast for a few other hidden beaches. The Playa del Amor (love beach) is just a five-minute drive and another five minutes will take you to Tehu, a small fishing village famed for their oysters and ancient lighthouse. Talk to Juan Pablo at the XXX, he speaks perfect English after living in Los Angeles most of his life and can give you all kinds of tips on where to hike and which beaches he loves.

His suggestion, which I didn’t have time to follow, was Playa Corrales, about an hour north, where he said the bay is so small and intimate it’s like floating in a Jacuzzi. Sitting at Juan Pablo’s place you can see the beaches of Villa del Mar across the bay. Supposedly the waves are rough because of their location but you should definitely decide for yourself.

For a stop on the way back to Puerto Vallarta, the tiny town of El Tuito is growing in popularity. It is famed for its dairy products so make sure to order the jocoque or queso fresco from a local restaurant. Another lovely side trip? The Vallarta Botanical Gardens on that same road, a breathtaking collection of local flora in the midst of the dry, tropical forest.

While travel times and complications can sometimes feel overwhelming, I promise you any of these hidden beach that you make the effort to visit will reward you with a delicious swim and an equally delicious day.

Lydia Carey is a freelance writer based in Mexico City and a frequent contributor to Mexico News Daily.

GET OFF THE BEATEN PATH IN PUERTO VALLARTA AND RIVIERA NAYARIT

GET OFF THE BEATEN PATH IN PUERTO VALLARTA AND RIVIERA NAYARIT

Rich culture, outshining natural beauty, a popular gastronomy scene, and host of activities, means Puerto Vallarta, in the state of Jalisco, and Riviera Nayarit, in the state of Nayarit, have become two much-loved destinations. Despite their popularity, there are still many amazing offbeat spots to discover – see 6 of them here:

Puerto Vallarta:

Explore Authentic Tuito

Buried in the mountains, about 45 minutes from Puerto Vallarta, is El Tuito. Cobbled streets, yellow and orange mudbrick houses and time-worn petroglyphs give this little town immense character. Themain square is surrounded by gardens, restaurants, cafés and artisan shops.

Find Serenity in Yelapa

In a beautiful natural cove at the foot of the majestic Sierra Madre mountains, surrounded by jungle, nature and the Pacific Ocean, is the small community of Yelapa. The tranquility and privacy make Yelapa the perfect place for artists and writers. It’s even completely free of any roads! The only way to reach the town is by water taxi, a 40 minute trip from Puerto Vallarta.

Discover the Charms of San Sebastián

Nestled deep within the hills of the Sierra Madre mountain range, the historic Mexican town of San Sebastián del Oeste dates back to 1605! It’s one of the few places in Mexico to conserve the charm of colonial architecture. You can admire all sort of wonderful views including of Cerro de La Bufa and Banderas Bay. And watching the sunset above the mountains in tranquility is one of the best things to do here!

Riviera Nayarit:

Visit Local Lo De Perla

A 3 hour guided tour takes you through the rainforest and Lo de Perla orchidarium, an amazing scene for wildlife lovers and those seeking a connection with nature. It’s a truly unique experience where you’ll encounter a marvelous diversity of colorful butterflies, orchids, mammals, reptiles, birds, and insects. The tour is a perfect day out for the whole family!

Take a Scenic Drive to Offbeat Punta El Custodio

An hour and a half drive through popular seaside towns will have you enjoying isolated beaches, creative artisans and pristine nature in Punta El Custodio. Visit Platanitos Beach, a traditional fishing village and enjoy the delicious seafood dishes in thatched-roof huts lining the seashore. Don’t miss the “Hummingbird Garden”, a sanctuary with more than 130 species, for a truly off the beaten path experience.

Marvel at the Sacred Tatei Haramara Islet

The sacred White Rock, Tatei Haramara, is an important sight located across from Playa del Rey in San Blas. For the Wixárika people, it’s the physical manifestation of the goddess Haramara and the first solid object to appear in this world. According to Huichol legend, Tatei Haramara is the origin of all life. It’s one of the most sacred spots for the Huichol, the Cora and the Mexicanero people!

#remaxinpv

#puertovallartaremax

#remaxsitesmarina

#remaxdestiny

RE/MAX Puerto Vallarta and Community Service – September 7, 2019

 

I wish to share with you our latest, and more productive, Community Service event!

On Saturday, September 7, 2019, we gathered and tidied up, 67 full size garbage bags in the area of Benito Juarez, between the 2 tunnels.  We were able to do that in less than 1 hour.

That is incredible!

An additional reason is that we were so fortunate to have an extra 12 young persons to assist us, who were referred to us by Alex Breceda, who provides  free exercise training to persons that may not be able to pay for that.

This is our 5th event, and so far, we have gathered over 250 bags of garbage, that are off our streets.

REMAX Puerto Vallarta is also working with the city, that we will pay for, and install more garbage containers, in all areas of Puerto Vallarta.

This shall be done, firstly with education and information about the times of the pick-up’s of the garbage, but also with re-usable grocery bags to minimize the front-end of the garbage situation.

How we are going to do this is with: fund raisers, donations from restaurants, from our sponsors, and from our real estate community, both agency’s and developers.  Our communities, too!

We are not looking at the city to assist us, as I believe if you see a problem, fix it.

If you can share this message, as well as like our REMAX Facebook page, you shall receive our next community service location, as well as the other fund-raisers we shall be having; that would be wonderful.

We live here, love it and enjoy it incredibly, so I suggest to get more persons involved to make it even better.  

When you see the RE/MAX lime green shirt, please say thank you, as that person earned it by doing community service; for all of us!

Gracias!  Todd Bates #remaxinpv. #puertovallartaremax. #remaxsitesmarina #remaxdestiny

Could Mexico Cactus Solve the World’s Plastic Problem?

Could Mexico Cactus Solve the World’s Plastic Problem?


go to source
August 8, 2019
A material developed by Atemajac Valley University researcher Sandra Pascoe is made with the juice of a prickly pear cactus, and can be turned into discardable, non-polluting packaging.

Guadalajara, Jalisco – Mexico’s prickly pear cactus, which is emblazoned on the country’s flag, could soon play a new and innovative role in the production of biodegradable plastics.

A packaging material made from the plant has been developed by a Mexican researcher and is offering a promising solution to one of the world’s biggest pollution conundrums.

“The pulp is strained to obtain a juice that I then use,” said Sandra Pascoe, who developed the product and works at the Atemajac Valley University in the western city of Guadalajara.

That substance is then mixed with non-toxic additives and stretched to produce sheets which are colored with pigments and folded to form different types of packaging.

“What we’re doing is trying to concentrate on objects that don’t have a long life,” she said, particularly “single-use” packaging.Pascoe is still conducting tests, but hopes to patent her product later this year and look for partners in early 2020, with an eye towards larger-scale production.

The cacti Pascoe uses for her experiments come from San Esteban, a small town on the outskirts of Guadalajara, where they grow by the hundreds.

San Esteban is located in Jalisco state where, starting next year, single-use non-recyclable plastic bags, straws and other disposable items will be banned.

‘Drop in the Ocean’

Mexico City and states such as Baja California have also introduced similar measures.

In May, the capital city adopted a “historic” ban on plastic bags beginning in 2020. From 2021, straws, plastic plates and cutlery, and balloons will also be banned if they’re made “entirely or partially from plastic,” according to the bill adopted by the local congress.

Sandra Pascoe says her new material would be no more than a “drop in the ocean” in the battle to preserve the environment.

Given the rampant production of industrial plastics and the time it takes to make her material, there would need to be “other recycling strategies” to make any concrete difference, she said.

Latin America and the Caribbean account for around 10 percent of worldwide waste, according to United Nations figures.

In March, UN member states committed to “significantly reduce” single-use plastics over the next decade, although green groups warned that goal fell short of tackling the Earth’s pollution crisis.

Plastic pollution has become a global concern, particularly after bans imposed by China and other countries on the import of plastic waste from overseas.

Despite widespread alarm on the environmental cost, Asia and the United States lifted world production of plastic last year while Europe saw a dip, according to numbers released by the PlasticsEurope federation in June.

Source: Yahoo News

PUERTO VALLARTA PREPARES TO RECEIVE AND CARE FOR MORE THAN 130 THOUSAND TURTLES

PUERTO VALLARTA PREPARES TO RECEIVE AND CARE FOR MORE THAN 130 THOUSAND TURTLES

Puerto Vallarta was the home of 2,700 turtle nests in 2018, giving birth to 130,000 turtles, so this year the city is preparing its 14 kilometers of coastline to receive and care for them during this breeding season.

Currently, Puerto Vallarta is the only city to have a sea turtle protection plan on the Mexican Pacific, which has led to making Puerto Vallarta the best place in the country to see them in their habitat, the result of years of effort in conservation. The city records an 85% hatching rate.

The effort has also involved some hotels in the area such as the Marriott Puerto Vallarta Resort & Spa, Barceló Puerto Vallarta and Velas Vallarta, which as part of its attractions offer visitors to be part of the experience.

The task is not simple. The possibility of nesting occurs along the 14 kilometers of coastline, where Puerto Vallarta gathers thousands of tourists throughout the year to enjoy its beaches. However, there are some actions that tourists can carry out to contribute to the conservation of the species, such as avoiding throwing cigarette butts or leaving coal from the campfire on the beach, as they are substances that affect the degree of hatching of eggs.

In this part of the Mexican Pacific, four of the eight species of sea turtles are registered worldwide: black, hawksbill, lute and golf, the latter being the most popular.

In 2018 there was a great find, a new species of turtle was discovered, unique in the world and that exists only in Puerto Vallarta, so they registered it as “Casquito de Vallarta”.

Officially, the season is from August to December, however, several of them begin to arrive from mid-July.

A trip to Mazatlán changed the life of this expat from California

News
Surfer and former publisher Janet Blaser.

A trip to Mazatlán changed the life of this expat from California

Janet Blaser enjoys the Mexican lifestyle and has no plans to move back to the US

A trip to Mazatlán changed the life of a California woman who has now been living in the Sinaloa resort city for more than a decade and can’t imagine moving back to the United States.

Janet Blaser, formerly a food and restaurant writer in Santa Cruz, California, moved to Mazatlán in 2006 after she lost one journalism job and had her hours cut back at another as a result of the rise in popularity of online news.

A trip to the Pacific coast city in Mexico served as the impetus for her relocation decision.

“I fell in love, I felt this heart connection somehow — there were beautiful old buildings, cobblestone streets, plazas with wrought iron and the beautiful glittering Pacific Ocean, warm and swimmable,” Blaser told the financial information website MarketWatch.

“It just felt deeply healing, friendly and welcoming,” she added.

Another reason for Blaser’s move was that she spotted an interesting opportunity.

There were a lot of English-speaking expats and tourists in town but little information about Mazatlán’s social and cultural life and Blaser’s journalistic experience and ingenuity could fix that.

So in 2006, the writer and surfing enthusiast packed up her car and set her sights on starting a new life in northern Mexico. A plan to move to New Orleans was put on the backburner.

Blaser admitted to having doubts about the move but knew that staying in California would stretch her budget and leave her with an uncertain future.

During her first year in Mazatlán, Blaser worked part time as an online editor as she planned how to start an arts and entertainment publication that would provide information to the English-speaking residents of the city and the tourists who visit.

In 2007, she launched M! Magazine and continued to run the successful publication for nine years. In the same period, Blaser started a local organic farmers’ market.

The 63-year-old is now retired but remains busy: she has just published a book entitled Why We Left: An Anthology of American Women Expats, in which 27 essays of women living happily in Mexico are compiled.

Even though her magazine publishing days are over, Blaser is not thinking about relocating north of the border even though she says she misses her three adult children and three grandkids, all of whom live in the United States.

“I can’t imagine living in the U.S. again,” she told MarketWatch, explaining that the cheaper cost of living in Mexico – Blaser lives on about US $1,000 a month – was one but not the only reason why.

“I couldn’t afford to live in the States again” Blaser said before adding that she prefers the “easygoing Mexican lifestyle” in any case.

“It’s a very different vibe here that’s kind of hard to explain. It’s not about being retired, because I wasn’t that until a year ago. It’s just a different understanding of what’s important in life, and a more relaxed live-and-let-live attitude. If something doesn’t get done today, there’s always tomorrow, or the next day. What’s the big deal?” she said.

“. . . I’m able to actually live a more simple life and be satisfied in a way I could never before in the U.S.”

Source: MarketWatch (en)

#remaxinpv

#puertovallartaremax

#remaxsitesmarina

#remaxdestiny

La Campana, Jalisco’s ‘Psychedelic Bell,’ is a jewel of natural beauty

La Campana, a bizarre little mountain.La Campana, a bizarre little mountain.

La Campana, Jalisco’s ‘Psychedelic Bell,’ is a jewel of natural beauty

As you walk up the smooth, undulating surface you come upon one strange, sweeping shape after another

Highway 70 could be called “the adventurous way” to travel from Guadalajara to Puerto Vallarta.

This road takes you past the legendary mining town of Guachinangowith its shimmering church covered with a million shards of broken porcelain plates, past Atenguillo, famed for its rustic raicilla distilleries hidden in the hills.

The highway then passes near Talpa with its celebrated maple forest, which has been around since the Pleistocene, through Mascota, renowned for its majestic casonas (mansions) with walls a meter thick, and on past San Sebastián del Oeste, the gorgeous mountain village “forgotten by time,” finally arriving at Puerto Vallarta, six hours distant.

There are so many picturesque towns along this route through western Jalisco that most travelers whiz right by a true jewel of natural beauty and surely the most bizarre little mountain I’ve seen anywhere in the world: La Campana (“the bell”).

The local people call it “The Bell” because that’s what it looks like when you glimpse it — for all of two seconds — as you zoom around one of a hundred curves on the ever-twisting highway approaching Mascota.

From the highway it looks like a bell.

From the highway it looks like a bell.

This spot is a two-hour drive from Guadalajara and at this point your stomach is probably growling and you can almost smell the tantalizing aromas awaiting you at the excellent Navidad restaurant in Mascota. What could I ever say to convince you to pull off the highway onto a little dirt road barely visible among the tall pine trees?

Well, if you drive down that road only 20 meters, step out of your car and gaze upward, I know you’re going to be hooked. With only a bit of imagination you might swear you were looking at a very bizarre sculpture of a giant puma battling a gargantuan hammerhead shark.

“Well, well, that definitely does look interesting,” is the reaction I have heard from every soul I have coaxed into stopping here. No matter how loudly their stomachs were growling, they would inevitably ask, “How long do I have to walk to go see it?”

When I tell them it’s only five minutes to the base of La Campana, believe it or not, curiosity always wins out over hunger, and off we go to visit what I call “The Psychedelic Bell.”

After that short walk, you suddenly step out of the forest on bare volcanic rock. As you walk up the smooth, undulating surface, you come upon one after another strange, sweeping shapes you’d swear must have been sculpted by Antonio Gaudí or Salvador Dalí. Who else would put frozen waves of rock on top of a mountain? Of course, instead of breaking waves, you may see something quite different.

Whatever the case, please watch your step. There are no guard rails or rangers here to protect you and a false step could be fatal.  It’s not a hike for small children unless you’re carrying them in your backpack.

Owner of La Campana, Tino López, is always ready to guide visitors up the mountain.

Owner of La Campana, Tino López, is always ready to guide visitors up the mountain.

After soaking up this semi-psychedelic view, feast your eyes on the panorama below stretching into the distance. No matter how you felt when you started up the mountain, by the time you reach the top, you will surely be inundated with good vibrations! The length of this walk, by the way, is only 428 meters from your car to the peak of the hill.

I first stumbled upon La Campana some 30 years ago. Seeing so many smooth, clean, sweeping, baby-pink surfaces, I couldn’t help but wonder how long they would remain in that pristine state. But every time I have returned, including very recently, I have found the mountain free of trash and the wave-like formations entirely free of graffiti.

Credit for this must surely go to the local landowner, Tino López, whom we first met years ago when we stepped out of our cars and were hailed by a friendly voice — in English, mind you:

“Welcome! Do you want to visit La Campana?”

Don Tino then showed us the short and easy route to the base of the mountain, which we continue to use today. “My house is close by,” he reminded us before leaving. “Just tell people to shout my name when they arrive, and I’ll be glad to guide them.”

Another reason why La Campana is in such good condition — and the surrounding forest free of wildfires — is because the local headquarters of Conafor, the National Forestry Commission, is located only a few meters above the spot where you parked your car and the rangers are always vigilant.

    • 2—DSC_0153
      Another view of La Campana.
  • 2—DSC_0153
  • 3—DSC_0161
  • 5—GR-Trail-to-La-Campana
  • 6—GR-Window-view-of-sister-peak
  • 7—Old-Mans-Beard-antibiotic
  • 8—Panorama
  • 10—The-View-from-the-top

If you are interested in camping, there’s a nice flat area — no facilities of any kind — 500  meters east of the gate (at N20.37170 W104.59058). But a high-clearance vehicle may be needed to reach the spot. In the rainy season you’ll find a small brook next to your tent.

One advantage of camping is that you could visit La Campana both early and late in the day, when the light gives it very different looks. And don’t be surprised if you scare up a deer or two as you hike from the campsite to the peak.

If you’d like to visit “The Psychedelic Bell,” ask Google Maps to take you to “La Campana, Atenguillo, Jalisco.” Upon arriving, you will see a sign saying Puerto La Campana. Continue past the sign and make a very sharp right turn onto an easy-to-miss dirt road.

A few meters from the highway you can park in front of an iron gate. Just a few meters past the gate, look for the start of a trail on your right. Walk east uphill and you will soon be on an ever-more-obvious path that takes you directly to the base of the little mountain.

If you go up there with children, be sure to keep them tightly in hand because a strong gust of wind could blow a child right over the edge.

Enjoy the good vibrations!

The writer has lived near Guadalajara, Jalisco, for more than 30 years and is the author of A Guide to West Mexico’s Guachimontones and Surrounding Area and co-author of Outdoors in Western Mexico. More of his writing can be found on his website.

#remaxinpv

#puertovallartaremax

#remaxsitesmarina

#remaxdestiny